Well, I would suggest a pause for thought. Did you know that the offence of Perverting the Course of Justice (POCJ) can be committed after the Police issue a Notice of Intended Prosecution (NIP), following an allegation of a minor motoring offence such as speeding?

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Have New Drug Driving Laws Been Successful?

By Solicitor at 00:00

Previously the police could only charge a driver on the basis that their driving was impaired because of a drug. In order to secure a conviction at court, they had to prove not only that the driver had a controlled drug in their system but also that the individual was impaired to drive as a consequence of that drug. They would adduce evidence on the physical condition of the driver and any bad driving, poor performance in field impairment tests and blood results demonstrating presence of the drug. They would also have to show that a police doctor had found that the impaired condition of the driver may be due to a drug. As you can imagine, there are many avenues to defend against this charge and we have found the acquittal rate to be high.

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Driverless Cars: The End of Human Error?

By Solicitor at 00:00

The government wants the UK to be at the forefront of this new technology. They believe that the proliferation of driverless cars will have significant benefits: 1) Increase in road safety – over 90% of accidents are caused by human error such as being distracted, carelessness or driving too fast. 2) Reduced insurance claims leading to lower insurance premiums. 3) Social inclusion for the elderly or disabled. 4) A reduction in emissions and fuel efficiency 5) A reduction in congestion

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We have all witnessed motorists who have driven in excess of the speed limits on our local roads and motorways in the UK – it is unfortunately a common sight. But what is likely to happen if a driver has been caught driving at extraordinarily higher speeds than allowed by the law, for example driving at 80mph in a 30mph zone?

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The Dangerous Habit of Lane Hogging

By Solicitor at 00:00

It is all too common to see motorway and dual carriageway drivers failing to move into the left hand lane after overtaking. Part 264 of the Highway Code advises motorists that "You should always drive in the left-hand lane when the road ahead is clear”. Many motorists on UK roads don’t see a problem with middle lane hogging and are unaware that by doing so, they may be breaking the law. Some experts also believe that this style of driving leads to congestion on our motorways. There are also statistics that suggest lane hogging can frustrate drivers to the point whereby they admit that they resort to road rage.

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